top of page
  • Tracy Adler

Using Fehu, Uruz and Thurisaz

In this installment of my series on activating the energy body, we will be utilizing the Elder Futhark Runes Uruz and Thurisaz. As part of this next step, I believe it is important that we look at the lore in reference to our souls and the infinite knowledge that can be accessed by us. Two books that have been invaluable references to discovering the fact that we truly are spiritual beings in a material existence are “The road to Hel” by Hilda Roderick Ellis M.A., Ph.D. and “The Asatru’ Edda”, by Mark Puryear. “The road to Hel”, correlates several excerpts from our sacred lore as to the immortal nature of our souls and the cycle of re-birth that our ancestors knew of. “The Asatru’ Edda”, has combined, referenced, and sequenced the stories of the Elder Edda into a readable text.




The many examples from the Sagas and Lore of rebirth that are given in the chapter “THE CONCEPTION OF THE SOUL” from “The Road to Hel”, establish that we are more than our physical bodies. Rebirth among the Gods includes the Jotun maid Gullveig who was killed and burned by the Aesir 3 times. The third and final time she was determined by the Gods to be Gullveig incarnate, Thor killed her with his hammer without hesitation. Gullveig at this time was Freyr’s Mother-in-law and this action caused a war between the Vanir and Aesir resulting in the decapitation of Mímir and the banishment of Odin from Asgard. When Odin was finally restored and peace between the Aesir and Vanir was again established, the Aesir had to swear not to kill Gullveig should she be reborn again and show herself, but instead to banish her to Járnviðr.




So now armed with this knowledge of your own immortality and the cycle of rebirth, which you must know as a FACT, not a belief. We may start to seek access to the knowledge contained in Mímir’s well as Odin himself had done. Mímir is a Thurs and the knowledge he shares is invaluable if you are wanting to learn the true nature of Midgard. However, keep in mind this verse from the Hávamál before embarking on this path:




It is best for man to be middle-wise,




Not over cunning and clever:




The learned man whose lore is deep




Is seldom happy at heart.




From the lore we know that Mímir was a giant, son of Ymir and the description of Mímisbrunnr as compiled in the Asatru’ Edda:




“Next, there is that land, which is owned by Mímir, called Glasisvellir or Ókolnir. This is a place of indescribable magnificence, with flower fields and groves that are never ravaged by frost or winter. Here is also where Mímir’s hall is located. That wonderful hall that the Æsir call Brimir’s hall, was owned by Mímir. After his birth, Mímir became the guardian of the central well, Óðrœrir, or Mímisbrunnr, and the root of Yggdrasill borne out of it. Because this wellbore Yggdrasill’s seed, the great ash is called Mímameiðr as well. Hidden in the glorious well of Mímir lies all knowledge, and wisdom and intelligence are also hidden there. He is full of wisdom because each morning he drinks his mead from the Gjallarhorn. It is from him and his well that the rúnar and Galdr have their origin. “




The third rune in the Elder Futhark is Thurisaz. Thurisaz is known as a Thurs, which means giant and this giant is Mímir the guardian of Mímisbrunnr. Meditation on this rune will bring about an awakening, however, it is not free. Mímir demands a sacrifice as related to us from the Lore:




“One drink from Mímisbrunnr could help him; but Mímir, the well’s deep-minded guardian, refused him the drink before he would prove himself worthy through self-sacrifice. Then Óðinn gave himself as the sacrifice for his life task, which he described in his own words:




I know that I hung on the wind-tossed tree nine nights,




wounded by my spear, given to Óðinn, myself given to myself.




on that tree of which no one knows from what root it springs.




No one gave me bread, nor a horn of drink,




I peered downward, I took up the rúnar, wailing I learned them,




then fell down thence.




I obtained nine Fimbulljóðar from Bölþorn-Ymir’s, Bestla’s father’s, celebrated son, Mímir, and I got a drink of the precious mead drawn from Óðrœrir.




Then I began to quicken, and to become wise, and to grow and to prosper.




each word I sought resulted in a new word.




each deed I sought resulted in a new deed.




We must give a sacrifice for this knowledge, and the sacrifice that must be given is only known by you. It must hurt, it has to count, it must be difficult, it is not something that is easy. Odin did not eat or drink for 9 days and was shown the runes. There is this passage that may help from Havamal Stanza 68:




“Fire is best among the sons of men,




and the sight of the sun,




if a man can have his health with a life free from vice”




There are countless ways to interpret these Kennings, perhaps this Stanza is telling us that fire (Fehu) is more active when you conquer your vices. The point is you must look inside and know what is difficult for you and rise above it, putting your mind to the test. Control your appetite,




Change your diet, conquer your vices and make that sacrifice. At the very least you will build your will and become a healthier stronger person for pushing the limits of your body.




For this month, take the Fehu energy that you have been cultivating from last month’s exercise and move it up to your spine and center it between your eyes. This energy is moving in the form of the rune Uruz and can be equated as kundalini, Chi, or Prana. The rune Uruz is described as a mighty Auroch that bursts down barriers and this energy is being used to ignite the Third Eye, the eye that Odin placed into Mímir’s well. Meditate upon the rune Thurisaz, carve the rune in your mind, draw it in red on a card and stare at the shape and quiet your mind. Read everything possible relating to Thurisaz and its meaning, practice austerity. Austerity is your sacrifice; it is not denying yourself pleasure but removing obstacles that are preventing you from becoming who you really are.


Gothi Joe Rozanek


jrozanek@runestone.org

bottom of page